Home Expat Blogs @cabolife The Best Places to Live in Los Cabos Part III

The Best Places to Live in Los Cabos Part III

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The newly constructed Puerto Paraiso Shopping Mall in Los Cabos, Mexico
Credit: Ruth Peterkin | Shutterstock

In my last post, I talked about the San Jose Corridor. Today, the best places to live in Los Cabos Part III brings you a look at the Cabo Corridor. These two stretches of road make up the Corridor, which is one 20-mile stretch of highway connecting San Jose and Cabo San Lucas.

Just like the San Jose Corridor, luxury resorts line the Sea of Cortez side of the highway on the Cabo Corridor. Places like The Montage, Chileno Bay, The Sheraton and Esperanza – all high-end and beautiful resorts. Many of them also offer luxury residences as well. You can have a home within these communities for a couple million dollars easily. And for most of these owners, they are second, third and even fourth homes.

As you get closer to Cabo though, there are communities that are much more affordable. The oldest gated community on the ocean side in Cabo is called Cabo Bello. It is located right across the highway from a wonderful little market called Santa Carmella, along with a furniture store, yoga studio and more. Cabo Bello has beach access and a wide variety of architectural styles and price points behind its gates. You can find a fixer-upper home for under US$250,000 and nice family homes in the US$300,000 to $500,0000 range and upwards.

Next door to Cabo Bello is another beachfront gated community called Santa Carmela. Prices here are a little higher than Cabo Bello, but much more affordable than homes in the luxury resort communities up the road.

On the inland side of the highway, you may not have direct beach access, but the views can be phenomenal. Cresta del Mar, Hermitage, Tramonti, Casa Mexicana, Tomar and Pierta de Hierra are all gated HOA communities. And there are many more that line the road as you head into Cabo. Depending on your budget, there are homes and condos at a range of price points.

Minutes down the street, you will find an area called El Tezal. Also very centrally located, there are a wide range of older and newer developments with condos and homes at affordable price points. Ventanas, for example, is a four-phase development. A combination of locals and expats own homes and condos in this community. In it as well are other developments such as Privadas and Vistana del Cabo, where you can find a home or a condo at a wide variety of price points. Some require fixing up as they are older properties, but others, like Solaria, are brand new communities.

People like these areas because you are minutes from Costco, Walmart and Home Depot – familiar places to us expats. And you are close to Cabo San Lucas, but not right in the town that is known for its nightlife.

On the edge of town and close to the very well-known Medano Beach, there are some larger condo complexes and, depending on your style and budget, you can find your Cabo residence for anywhere from US$250,000 to upwards of a million plus. Puerto Las Cabos Village is one such complex where you are walking distance to the beach, across from the local soccer field and next to the brand-new Cabo water park. Condos here start at around US$250,000. Seconds away is the Villa complex comprised of Villa de Arco, Villa de Palmer and Villa La Estancia. These towers are right on the beach and prices reflect their beachfront location. Many of the owners in these developments rent out their units so you will have a combination of residents and tourists living by you.

While there are apartments for rent and purchase in downtown Cabo, the people who generally buy here are those that are more seasonal residents who want walking access to all that Cabo San Lucas has to offer. And for those who like activity, and marina views and access, there are condos located right on or by the Cabo Marina, which is a hub of activity day and night.

The bottom line is that the Cabo Corridor and downtown Cabo offer many different types of living and vacationing options at a wide variety of price points. It is most important to determine what is important to you. For example:

  • Do you want beachfront or beach access?
  • What about a great view of the water but not direct access?
  • Do you want to be able to walk around town?
  • Do you prefer marina or Sea of Cortez views?
  • Will you be looking to rent out your condo or home (there are communities that do better for renting than others)?
  • Do you want an HOA community that offers gated access and security?

In my next blog, I will introduce you to the Pacific side of Cabo. Some people prefer it over being on or near the Sea of Cortez. The temperatures are a little cooler, the wind a little gustier and the ocean a little wilder. The views are incredible though and the access to town can be just as easy.

1 COMMENT

  1. Wow! None of this sounds like good news for Mexicans. These are very high prices for real estate, and most Mexicans are being priced out of owning their own homes in such a market. The same was true in Santa Barbara, CA, where Silicon Valley cash, buying secondary homes or rental properties, drove prices so high that when workers flood into the city from distant homes each morning, the population almost doubles! Normal people simply cannot afford to live there.

    I recently saw a very interesting and well thought-out take on this that I recommend expats consider:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPQRJCr1JAU&fbclid=IwAR1WTVy7di4wzVw0Kb-wkgiPRtHMjJ9G5jP6pgmU1unleEUpHVedd6T-g-s

    We see similar things happening in Mérida Centro. We are a large enough city that there are still options for locals, but they are gradually feeling the pinch of prices rising because of speculators and second-home buyers willing to plop down insane amounts of money for properties.

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